Historical brews from Canada

Hi Folks!

Here a few interesting historical brews from Canada. All of these recipes are taken from "Young's Demonstrative Translation Of Scientific Secrets; Or A Collection Of Above 500 Useful Receipts On A Variety Of Subjects" by Daniel Young. Printed by Rowsell & Ellis, King Street East, Toronto, Canada, 1861. The entire document was deciphered, computerized, and uploaded to the Compuserve TWHOME Forum (secret.zip) by Paul Hubbs and Bob Gravonic of Toronto.

Cider Without Apples

To each gallon of cold water put 1 lb. common sugar, 1/2 ounce of tartaric acid, one tablespoonful of yeast, shake well, make in an evening and it will be fit for use next day. I make in a keg a few gallons at a time, leaving a few quarts to make into next time, not using yeast again until the keg needs rinsing. If it gets a little sour, make a little more into it or put as much water with it as there is cider and put it with the vinegar. If it is desired to bottle this cider by manufacturers of small drinks, you will proceed as follows: put in a barrel 5 gallons of hot water, 30 lbs. of brown sugar, 3/4 lb. of tartaric acid, 25 gallons of cold water, 3 pints of hop or brewer's yeast, work into paste with 3/4 lb. of flower, and one pint water will be required in making this paste; put all together in a barrel which it will fill and let it work 24 hours, the yeast running out at the bung all the time by putting in a little occasionally to keep it full; then bottle, putting in two or three broken raisins to each bottle, and it will nearly equal champagne.

Spruce or Aromatic Beer

Take 3 gallons of water, 2 1/2 pints molasses, 3 eggs well beaten, 1 gill yeast, put into two quarts of the water boiling hot, put in 50 drops of any oil you wish the flavour of, or mix one ounce each, oil sarsafras, spruce, and wintergreen; then use the 50 drops. For ginger flavour take 2 ounces ginger root bruised and a few hops, and boil for 30 minutes in one gallon of the water, strain and mix all; let it stand 2 hours and bottle, using yeast, of course, as before.

Lemon Beer

To make 20 gallons, boil 6 ounces of ginger root bruised, 1/4 lb. cream-tartar for 20 or 30 minutes in 2 or 3 gallons of water; this will be strained into 13 lbs. of coffer sugar on which you have put 1 oz. oil of lemon and six good lemons all squeezed up together, having warm water enough to make the whole 20 gallons, just so you can hold your hand in it without burning, or some 70 degrees of heat; put in 1 1/2 pint hops or brewer's yeast worked into paste as for cider, with 5 or 6 oz. of flower; let it work over night, then strain and bottle for use. This will keep a number of days.

Philadelphia Beer

Take 30 gallons of water, brown sugar 20 lbs., ginger root bruised 1/4 lb., cream tartar 1 1/4 lb., carbonate of soda 3 ounces, oil of lemon 1 teaspoonful, put in a little alcohol, the white of 10 eggs well beaten, hops 2 ounces, yeast one quart. The ginger root and hops should be boiled for 20 or 30 minutes in enough of the water to make all milk warm; then strain into the rest, and the yeast added and allowed to work itself clear as the cider and bottled.

A Superior Ginger Beer

Take of sugar 10 lbs., lemon juice 9 oz., honey 1/2 lb., bruised ginger root 11 oz., water 9 galls., yeast 3 pints, boil the ginger in the water until the strength is all extracted, which you may tell be tasting the root, then pour it into a tub, throwing the roots away, let it stand until nearly luke warm, then put in all the rest of the ingredients, stir well until all dissolved, cover it over with a cloth, and if it be in the evening, let it remain until next morning, then strain through cloth, and bottle it, and in a short time it will be fit for use. Some use less sugar, and some less lemon juice, to make it with less expense; but it is not so elegant a drink as this.

Ginger Pop No. 1

Take of water 5 1/2 galls., ginger root bruised 3/4 lb., tartaric acid 1/2 oz., white sugar 2 1/4 lbs., the whites of 3 eggs well beat, a small teaspoonful of oil of lemon, yeast 1 gill; boil the root for 30 minutes in 1 gallon of the water, strain off, and put the oil in while hot, mix all well, make over night, in the morning skim, and bottle, keeping out sediment.

Ginger Pop No. 2

Take best white Jamaica ginger root bruised 2 oz., water 6 quarts, boil 20 minutes and strain, then add cream tartar 1 oz., white sugar 1 lb.; put on the fire, then stir until all the sugar is dissolved; then put into an earthen jar, now put in tartaric acid 1/4 oz., and the rind of 1 lemon, let it stand until 70 degrees of Fahrenheit, or until you can bear your hand in it with comfort, then add two tablespoonsful of yeast, stir well, bottle for use, and tie the corks; make a few days before it is wanted for use.

Improved English Strong Beer

If you have malt use it, if not, take 1 peck of barley, and put it into a stove oven, and steam the moisture from them, grind coarsely, and pour into them 3 1/2 gallons of water, at 170 or 172 degrees. (If you use malt it does not need quite so much water, as it does not absorb so much as the other. The tub should have a false bottom with many gimblet holes to keep back the grain.) Stir them well and let stand 3 hours and draw off, put on 7 gallons more water at 180 or 182 degrees, stir well, let stand 2 hours and draw off, then put 1 gallon or 2 of cold water, stir well and draw off; you should have about 5 or 6 gallons; mix 6 lbs., coarse brown sugar in equal amount of water, add 4 oz. of good hops, boil for 1 1/2 hour; you should have from 8 to 10 gallons when boiled; when cooled to 80 degrees, put in a teacupful of good yeast and let it work 18 hours covered with a sack. Use sound iron-hooped kegs, or porter bottles, bung or cork tight, and in two weeks it will be good sound beer, nearly equal in strength to London porter, or good ale, and will keep a long time.

Hop Beer

Take of hops 6 oz., molasses 5 quarts, boil the hops in water till the strength is out, strain them into a 30 gallon barrel, add the molasses and a teacupful of yeast, and fill up with water, shake it well and leave the bung out until fermented, which will be in about 24 hours; bung up, and it will be fit for use in about 3 days. A most excellent summer drink, smaller quantities in proportion.

Happy historical experimentation! And, oh yes, Bula!

John H. Grant
74444.3034@compuserve.com


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Spencer W. Thomas (spencer@umich.edu)