Pale Ale

Recipe Menu


Dry Ale

Back to menu Source: Martin Lodahl (pacbell!pbmoss!mal@hplabs.HP.COM) Digest: Issue #203, 7/18/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: This beer was made using the small-scale mash procedure described by Miller in The Complete Handbook of Home Brewing. Comments: This beer had an unpleasant "dry" feeling to it and left me thirsty. Possibly my sparging procedure could be at fault with too much hot water being passed over the grains. It is also possible that the yeast was too attenuative or that the fermentation temperatures were too high (ambient temperature fluctuated between 70 and 90 degrees). 2

Yeast Test Recipe

Back to menu Source: Jeff Casey (casey@alcvax.pfc.mit.edu) Digest: Issue #512, 10/8/90 Ingredients (for 7 gallons):
Procedure: This is a 7-gallon recipe. Steep crystal malt while bringing water to a boil. Remove crystal malt and add extract. Boil. Comments: This is a 7-gallon recipe that was divided into 7 1-gallon fermenters for the purpose of testing different yeasts. Fermentation was carried out at 75-85 degrees. Best results were obtained with Edme ale yeast which was well-rounded and slightly sweet. Some diacetyl, but nice balance. Whitbread ale yeast was lighter and crisper, but had a poorer head and some esters. CWE ale yeast was very dry but had a good head and no esters---fermentation was frighteningly fast. 3

Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Rob Bradley (bradley@dehn.math.nwu.edu) Digest: Issue #504, 9/26/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: You'll get good yield and lots of flavor from English malt and a 1-stage 150 degree mash. In the boil, I added the finishing hops in increments: 1/4 ounce in last 30 minutes, 1/4 ounce in last 15 minutes, and 1/4 ounce at the end (steep 15 minutes) don't have to be Fuggles; almost any boiling hops will do, I usually mix Northern Brewer with Fuggles or Goldings (just make sure you get .12-.15 alpha). Conversion will pro- bably only take 60 minutes rather than 90. Depending on when you stop the mash your gravity may vary as high as 1.050. That's a lot of body! Comments: This is a simple all-grain recipe for a good pale ale that lets the beginner concentrate on the mashing process. Hallertauer may not be traditional for ales, but neither is a modern piano for sonatas. But I think Beethoven himself would have used one if he had one. Specifics: Original Gravity: up to 1.050 Final Gravity: up to 1.020 4

Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Alex Jenkins (atj@mirror.tmc.com) Digest: Issue #57, 1/24/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash pale malt, crystal malt, and gypsum in 2-3/4 gallons of 170 degree water; this should give initial heat of 155 degrees (pH 5.0). Maintain temperature at 140-155 degrees for 2 hours. Sparge. To wort, add extract and brown sugar. Boil with Willamette hops. After 15 minutes add Hallertauer and Irish moss. Dry hop with clusters and steep. When cool, add wort to carboy and pitch yeast. The posted recipe called for 4 pounds of dry extract with 2 cups re- served for priming. This seemed excessive and a good way to get explod- ing bottles, so we reduced the amount of extract to 3-1/2 pounds and assumed that standard priming techniques would be used, maybe replacing corn sugar with 3/4 to 1 cup of malt extract. --- Ed. Comments: Notice that I screwed up the hops: Clusters are for bittering, and Willamette (or Fuggles) for aromatic. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.048 Final Gravity: 1.011 Primary Ferment: 23 days 5

Too Sweet Ale

Back to menu Source: Bill Pemberton (flash@virginia.edu) Digest: Issue #398, 4/13/90 Ingredients:
Comments: This produced a wonderful beer, except that it was just too sweet for my likings. I shouldn't complain too much, all my friends thought it was great! I tried several variations of this, and all worked out well, but were too sweet for me. Several people suggested cutting back on the crystal and I may try that. I have also tried using a lager yeast to create a steam beer. 6

KGB Bitters

Back to menu Source: Andy Wilcox (andy@mosquito.cis.ufl.edu) Digest: Issue #415, 5/9/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Put all grains in brewpot with cool water. Remove when boil commences. Add malt extract and 1-1/2 ounce of hops. Boil 1 hour. Strain out boil- ing hops and add 1/2 ounce more hops and Irish moss. Boil 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add another 1/2 ounce of hops. Steep 10 minutes and cool. Strain wort into primary fermenter with cold water to make 5 gallons. Add final 1/2 ounce of hops. Comments: Water was filtered with a simple activated carbon system. This seems to make a big difference. Amateur judge commented, "Beautiful color. A bit under carbonated. Great hop nose and finishes very clean. Good balance with malt and hops, but lighten up on finishing hops a bit and it's perfect. Very marketable." 7

Pale Ale #2

Back to menu Source: Todd Enders Digest: Issue #417, 5/15/90 Ingredients (for 2 gallons):
Procedure: Recipe makes 2 gallons. Mash in 5 quarts water at 140 degrees, maintain temperature of 150-152 degrees for 2 hours. Mash out 5 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparge in 2-1/2 gallons at 160 degrees. Boil 90 minutes. Add boiling hops 45 minutes into boil. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.041 Final Gravity: 1.010 8

Pale After Math Ale

Back to menu Source: Ken van Wyk (ken@oldale.pgh.pa.us) Digest: Issue #418, 5/16/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash grains at 155 degrees. Sparge with 170 degrees water. Boil, adding extract and boiling hops; the hops were added in stages, 1 ounce at 50 minutes, 1 ounce at 30 minutes, and 1 ounce at 20 minutes. The Cascade hops were sprinkled in over the last 10 minutes of the boil. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.054 Final Gravity: 1.018 9

The Drive Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Dave Baer (dsbaer@Sun.COM) Digest: Issue #73, 2/13/89 Ingredients (for 10 gallons):
Procedure: This is a 10-gallon recipe; cut ingredients in half for 5 gallons. Steep grains in a mesh bag until water reaches boiling. Remove grains. Follow standard extract brewing process, adding extract and Cascade hops. I boiled the wort in an 8-gallon pot and added 4 gallons of cold water. Pitch yeast at about 80 degrees. I fermented this in a 20-gallon open container for 4 days, then racked to glass carboys for 24 days. Comments: This is a pale ale recipe I used for my class. I used M&F pale extract and grains were for demonstration more than flavor. I suggest doubling grain quantities if you want to get something out of them. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.047 Final Gravity: 1.010 Primary Ferment: 4 days Secondary Ferment: 24 days 10

Killer Party Ale

Back to menu Source: A.E. Mossberg (aem@mthvax.miami.edu) Digest: Issue #95, 3/7/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: In 1 gallon water, boil malt, golden syrup, sugar and 1-1/2 ounce hops for 8 minutes. Add remaining hops and boil another 2 minutes. Pour into primary fermenter with 2 gallons water. Bring another gallon of water to a boil and add flaked maize. Turn off heat and 1/3 pack of BrewMagic. Let sit 10 minutes. Add another 1/3 pack of BrewMagic. Let sit 10 more minutes. Strain maize into primary fermenter, and rinse with cold water. Discard maize. Fill primary to 5 gallon mark. Comments: This recipe comes from Craig McTyre at Wine & Brew By You. The Lyle's syrup is available in many grocery stores, usually located near the pancake syrup. BrewMagic is some sort of yeast nutrient/additive. It is available from Wine & Brew By You. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.090 Final Gravity: 1.015 11

Summer Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Jackie Brown (Brown@MSUKBS.BITNET) Digest: Issue #134, 4/24/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Use the standard temperature-controlled mash procedure described in Papazian. Use a 30 minute protein rest at 122 degrees, 20 minutes at 152 degrees, and 20 minutes at 158 degrees. Sparge with 4 gallons of 180 degree water. Boil 1 hour with Nugget hops. Add Irish moss in last 10 minutes. Remove from heat and steep Brambling hops for 15 minutes. Cool wort and pitch. Comments: This ale is light in color, but full-bodied. If you want an amber color, add a cup of caramel malt. I get a strong banana odor in most of my ales (from the Edme I believe) which subsides after 2-3 weeks in the bottle. If you don't have the capacity for 9 pounds of malt, you could substi- tute some extract for the pale malt. Just thinking about this makes me want to speed home and have a cool one. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.045 Final Gravity: 1.015 12

Perle Pale

Back to menu Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%studguppy@lanl.gov) Digest: Issue #378, 3/15/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: The 1/2 pound of Klages malt was toasted in a 350 degree oven for 10 minutes. The mash was done using Papazian's temperature-controlled method. The Willamette hops are added after the boil, while chilling with an immersion chiller. The yeast is rehydrated in 1/2 cup of 100 degree water. Comments: Perle pale was a beautiful light-golden ale, crisp yet full-bodied. 13

Mild Ale

Back to menu Source: Darryl Richman (darryl@ism.isc.com) Digest: Issue #371, 3/5/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Water was treated with 2 gm each MgSO4, CaSO4, KCl, and CaCO3. Mash grains in 3 gallons of water at 134 degrees. Hold 120-125 degrees for 55 minutes, raise to 157 degrees for 55 minutes. Raise to 172 degrees for 15 minutes. Sparge with 5-3/4 gallons water. Boil 15 minutes. Add bit- tering hops. Boil 55 minutes. Add finishing hops and boil 5 more min- utes. Chill and pitch with Sierra Nevada or Wyeast Northern Whiteshield yeast. Ferment and bottle or keg. Comments: This is the only beer I can make 10 gallons of on my stove. I mash and boil 5 gallons and then add 5 gallons of cooling water. The Wyeast makes this a beer a bit sweet and rich beyond its gravity. Emphasis is on the malt, with crystal and chocolate bringing up the rear; hops were notice- able, but not in the foreground. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.031 Final Gravity: 1.011 14

India Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Todd Enders (enders@plains.nodak.edu) Digest: Issue #402, 4/19/90 Ingredients (for 2 gallons):
Procedure: This is a 2-gallon batch. Mash in 5 quarts 132 degrees (140 degree strike heat). Adjust mash pH to 5.3. Boost temperature to 150 degrees. Mash 2 hours, maintaining temperature at 146-152 degrees. Mash out 5 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparge with 2 gallons of 165 degree water. Boil 90 minutes, adding hops in last hour. Add finishing hops 5 minutes before end of boil. Ferment at 70 degrees, 6 days in primary, 4 days in secondary. Comments: If you haven't tried mashing yet, you really should. You can start small and grow as equipment and funds permit. Also, by starting small, you don't have a large sum invested in equipment if you decide mashing isn't for you. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.043 Final Gravity: 1.008 Primary Ferment: 6 days Secondary Ferment: 4 days 15

Special Bitter

Back to menu Source: Chuck Cox (bose!synchro!chuck@uunet.UU.NET) Digest: Issue #556, 12/18/90 Ingredients (for 10 gallons):
Procedure: This is a 10-gallon partial mash recipe. Use standard procedures, brew- ing about 7 gallons of wort in a 10-gallon kettle, followed by a 7- gallon primary and 2 5-gallon secondaries, then keg (or bottle). 16

1990 Christmas Ale

Back to menu Source: Chuck Cox (bose!synchro!chuck@uunet.UU.NET) Digest: Issue #556, 12/18/90 Ingredients (for 9 gallons):
Procedure: This is a 9-gallon partial mash recipe. Use standard procedures, brewing about 7 gallons of wort in a 10-gallon kettle, followed by a 7-gallon primary and 2 5-gallon secondaries, then keg (or bottle). 17

Decent Extract Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Florian Bell (florianb%tekred.cna.tek.com) Digest: Issue #72, 2/11/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Add cracked grains to 2 gallons cold water. Bring to boil and promptly strain out grains. Add extract and Cascade hops. Boil 30 minutes. Add Kent Goldings hops in last five minutes. Comments: This brew results in a chill haze, which I don't pay any attention to since I don't care (I don't wash my windshield very often either). I am so impressed with this ale that I can't seem to make enough of it. This is a good pale ale, but not an excellent pale ale. It lacks sweetness and aroma. 18

Hot Weather Ale

Back to menu Source: Florian Bell (florianb%tekred.cna.tek.com) Digest: Issue #132, 4/19/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash the 3 pounds of plain malted barley using the temperature-step process for partial grain recipes described in Papazian's book. Boil 30 minutes, then add the Blue Ribbon extract (the cheap stuff you get at the grocery store) Add Willamette hops and boil another 30 minutes. Add Kent Goldings in last 5 minutes. When at room temperature, pitch yeast. Ferment at about 68 degrees using a 2-stage process. Comments: This turned out refreshing, light in body and taste, with a beautiful head (I used 1 cup corn sugar in priming). 19

Really Incredible Ale

Back to menu Source: T. Andrews (ki4pv!tanner@bikini.cis.ufl.edu) Digest: Issue #225, 8/11/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash all grains together. Add Northern Brewer at beginning of boil. Boil 90 minutes. During last 1/2 hour, add the Hallertauer hops. In last 15 minutes add the Cascade. Comments: The wheat helps make a beer very suitable to a warm climate. This has been a hot summer; it has topped 100 degrees (in the shade) several times. 20

British Bitter

Back to menu Source: Fred Condo (fredc@pro-humanist.cts.com) Digest: Issue #528, 10/31/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep crystal malt and sparge twice. Add extract and dextrose and bring to boil. Add Cascade hops and boil 60 minutes. In last few minutes add remaining 1/4 ounce of Cascade (or dry hop, if desired). Chill and pitch yeast. Comments: This really shouldn't be too highly carbonated. This is a well-balanced brew with good maltiness and bitterness. It was good when fresh, albeit cloudy, but this is okay in a pale ale. After 2 months of refrigeration, it is crystal clear and still delicious! (And there's only 1 bottle left.) By the way, Munton & Fison yeast is very aggressive---fermenta- tion can be done in 24-72 hours. I hope you like this as much as I do. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.058 Final Gravity: 1.022 Primary Ferment: 4 days 21

Six Cooks Ale

Back to menu Source: Jeffrey Blackman (blackman@hpihouz.cup.hp.com) Digest: Issue #528, 10/31/90 Ingredients (for 10 gallons):
Procedure: This recipe makes 10 gallons. Bring 3 gallons of water to a boil. Add 4 teaspoons of gypsum, four ounces of hops, and 10 pounds of the DME extract. Bring to boil. Boil 45 minutes. Add 2 ounces of Hallertauer hops in last 1 minute of boil. Strain wort into large vessel containing additional 7 gallons of water (we used a 55 gallon trash can). Allow wort to cool and siphon into 5-gallon carboys. Add yeast. Caveat Brewor: Trash cans are generally not food-grade plastic, digest wisdom calls for avoiding non-food-grade plastic. Brewer discretion is advised. -Ed. Comments: This is more hoppy than most of the Old Style/Schaefer persuasion seem to prefer. If you think it's too much, cut back. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.030 Final Gravity: 1.007 Primary Ferment: 3 weeks 22

Bass Ale

Back to menu Source: Rob Bradley (bradley@math.nwu.edu) Digest: Issue #528, 10/31/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: This is an all-grain recipe---follow the instructions for an infusion mash in Papazian, or another text. The Northern Brewer hops are boiled for a full hour, the Fuggles for 1/2 hour, and the Fuggles finishing hops after the wort is removed from the heat, it is then steeped 15 minutes. Comments: I'm a hophead (as you may have guessed). Purists may object to brown sugar in beer, but a careful tasting of Bass reveals brown sugar or molasses in the finish---not as strong as in Newcastle, but present. British malt, in particular, can easily stand up to a bit of sugar, both in flavor and in gravity. 23

Carp Ale

Back to menu Source: Gary Mason (mason@habs11.enet.dec.com) Digest: Issue #529, 11/2/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Break seal of yeast ahead of time and prepare a starter solution about 10 hours before brewing. Bring 2 gallons water to boil with crushed crystal malt. Remove crystal when boil starts. Fill to 6 gallons and add DME. After boiling 10 minutes, add Fuggles. At 55 minutes, add a pinch of Irish moss. At 58 minutes, add Kent Goldings. Cool (I used an immersion chiller) to about 80 degrees. Pitch yeast and ferment for about a week. Rack to secondary for 5 days. Keg. Comments: This is based on Russ Schehrer's Carp Ale from the 1986 Zymurgy special issue. The beer has a light hops flavor and could use some work on the mouth feel. It is also a bit cloudy. Specifics: Final Gravity: 1.016 Primary Ferment: 7 days Secondary Ferment: 4 days 24

Samuel Adams Taste-Alike

Back to menu Source: Gene Schultz (gschultz@cheetah.llnl.gov) Digest: Issue #652, 6/5/91 Ingredients (for 4 gallons):
Procedure: Steep one pound of crystal malt for 30 minutes in 2 quarts of water heated to 170 degrees. Strain out grains. Add the syrup from the kit, water, 3/4 ounce of Saaz hops and boil for 60 minutes, then remove the heat and added 3/4 ounce of Saaz hops for finishing. Although I am a fanatic for liquid yeast, I (grimaced and) added the dry Coopers yeast supplied with the kit to the cooled wort in the primary. I transferred to secondary after two days. All fermentation was at approximately 60 degrees. I primed with 5/8 cup of corn sugar. Comments: Very similar in taste, body, and color (where did the red come from?) to Samuel Adams, but just a hint of the flavor of Anchor Steam Beer. Specifics: Primary Ferment: 2 days 25

Frane's House Ale

Back to menu Source: Jeff Frane (70670.2067@compuserve.com) Digest: Issue #740, 10/8/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash with 3-1/2 gallons of water at 155 degrees (our water is very soft; I add 4 grams gypsum and 1/4 gram epsom salts in mash; double that in the sparge water) for 90 minutes or until conversion is complete. Sparge to 6 gallons, boil 90 minutes. After 15 minutes, add 3/4 ounce Eroica hops. At end of boil, add 1 ounce Mt. Hood hops. Ferment at 65 degrees with WYeast American Ale yeast (in starter). Bottle two weeks later, drink one week later. Comments: Yummy. Specifics: Primary Ferment: 2 weeks at 65 degrees 26

Brew Free or Die IPA

Back to menu Source: Kevin L. McBride (gozer!klm@uunet.UU.NET) Digest: Issue #741, 10/9/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Add the crystal malt to cold water and apply heat. Simmer for 15 minutes or so then sparge into boiling kettle. Add DME, top up kettle and bring to boil. When boil starts, add boiling hops and boil for 60 minutes. 10 minutes before end of boil add 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss. When boil is complete, remove heat, add finishing hops and immediately begin chilling wort. Strain wort into fermenter and pitch yeast starter. Primary fer- mentation took about 4 days. Let the beer settle for another 2 days and then rack to a sanitized, primed (1/3 cup boiled corn sugar solution) and oxygen purged keg and apply some CO2 blanket pressure. Comments: After one week in the keg the beer was clear, carbonated, and very drinkable although it had a very noticeable alcoholic nose. After 2 weeks the beer was incredibly smooth, bitter, and wonderfully aromatic. Several friends raved about this beer including one who lived in England for a while said that this was one of the best IPAs he's ever had and definitely the best homebrew he's ever had. After 2-1/2 weeks it was all gone because we drank the whole thing. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.055 (didn't measure, just a guess) Final Gravity: 1.012 Primary Ferment: 6 days Secondary Ferment: 1 week (in keg) 27

Number 23

Back to menu Source: John S. Watson (watson@pioneer.arc.nasa.gov) Digest: Issue #747, 10/24/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: About a week before, make a starter from 2 bottles of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Use about 4 tablespoons of plain light malt extract syrup and a couple of hop pellets. Boil major ingredients, ala Complete Joy of Home Brewing, in 2 gallons of water. (60 minute boil). Add 1/3 ounce Chinook hops at start of boil, 1/3 ounce Chinnook at 30 minutes and 1/3 ounce of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil. Then combine with 3 gallons of ice cold tap water (which was boiled the previous night, and cooled in the freezer) in a 7 gallon carboy. Ferment in primary for a week. Put 1/2 ounce of Cascade pellets in bottom of secondary and rack beer into secondary. Bottle three weeks later. Comments: This a report on my second use of "maltose" (a cheap rice malt available from most Oriental Markets). In the previous attempt ("Number 17", see HBD #541 or The Cat's Meow: p 36) there were a few problems. It was also my first attempt at culturing yeast (from a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale), and for various reasons, it didn't work very well. The other problem was I used to much maltose, about 40%, which made the result a little too light. This time I decided to use about 20% maltose, which IMHO, is just about right. I've also since perfected yeast culturing. The result is a nice thirst quenching, summer ale, which, with my favorite pizza, is heaven*2. Taste: Excellent! Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.036 @ 74 degrees Final Gravity: 1.006 @ 69 degrees Primary Ferment: 1 week Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks 28

Striped Cat I.P.A.

Back to menu Source: Mark Stevens (stevens@stsci.edu) Digest: Issue #754, 11/14/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Procedure is that described by Papazian...steep grains, boil 1 hour (boil Brewers Gold and Bullion). Remove from heat and add the cascades. Cool wort. Pitch yeast. Comments: I have made this twice and both times it turned out fine. Nicely hoppy. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.068 Final Gravity: 1.020 Primary Ferment: 4 days Secondary Ferment: 10 days 29

Crying Goat Ale

Back to menu Source: Bob Jones (BJONES@NOVA.llnl.gov) Digest: Issue #785, 12/19/91 Ingredients (for 11 gallons):
Procedure: Toast 1-1/2 pounds of 2 row Klages malt in oven at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. Allow to age a couple of weeks before use. Treat mash water with 1 teaspoon of gypsum. Mash grains in a single temperture infusion for 90 minutes at 155 degrees. Mash out for 10 minutes at 170 degrees. Sparge with 11 gallons of 168 degree water. Bring to a boil and boil for 90 minutes. Add 2 ounces of Northern Brewer hops at 10 minutes into the boil. Add Irish Moss in last 30 minutes of boil. Turn off heat and add 2 ounces of Cascade hops for a 10 minute steep. Chill. Pitch yeast. After one week, rack to secondary and add 4 ounces of Cascade hops. Bottle or keg when ferment is complete. Comments: This is a big, hoppy brew, loaded with aromatic cascade hop fragrance. It has that front of the mouth bitterness that can only be achieved with dry hoping, so don't skip it if you really want to duplicate this flavor profile. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.070 Final Gravity: 1.020 Primary Ferment: 1 week at 65--68 degrees 30

Double Diamond

Back to menu Source: Brian Glendenning (bglenden@NRAO.EDU) Digest: Issue #581, 2/14/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: This is an infusion mash at 156 degrees. Sparge, and add brown sugar, and malto-dextrins. Bring to boil and add 2 ounces Williamette hops. After 60 minutes, turn off heat and steep 1/2 ounce Williamette hops for 10-15 minutes. Comments: My notes say that it was close in flavour but a bit light in both colour and body compared to the real thing. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.051 Final Gravity: 1.010 31

Bass Ale

Back to menu Source: Ron Ezetta (rone@badblues.wr.tek.com) Digest: 1/15/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep crystal malt and remove grains before boil begins. Add malt extract and brown sugar. Bring to a boil and boil for 60 minutes. Add 1 ounce Northern Brewer at beginning of boil, 1 ounce of Fuggle at 30 minutes and 1/2 ounce of Fuggle for the last 10 minutes. Turn off heat and add final 1/2 ounce Fuggle. Let steep for 15 minutes. Cool. Pitch yeast. Comments: I did a side by side comparison last night. The real Bass is slightly darker, more malty and more bitter with less hop flavor than I remember. I suspect that my sample bottle of Bass was not freshest (but that's one of the reasons we homebrew!). The homebrew Bass has significantly more fuggle hop aroma and flavor. I'd like to think that my version is a "Northwest style" Bass. To better approach the real Bass, eliminate the 1/2 ounce of fuggles for the 10 minute boil, and steep the finish hops for 5 minutes. I would also try 80L crystal. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.048 32

India Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Josh Grosse (jdg00@amail.amdahl.com) Digest: 2/13/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash pale malt at 153 F for 30-60 minutes. Test after 30 minutes. Add Crystal and Carapils and mash-out at 168 F for 10 minutes. Sparge. Bring to boil. In a saucepan, boil the oak for no more than 10 minutes, then strain the liquid into your boiling kettle. Boil the wort, adding boil- ing hops after 30 minutes and the flavor hops and Irish Moss after 75 minutes. Chill and pitch a quart of 1059 starter. Dry hop in the secondary fermenter. The beer will clear in the bottle. Comments: I've fallen head over heels in love with 1059 American Ale Yeast. I find it gives wonderful pear and rasberry aromatics, and if I have a carboy filled to the shoulder, I *don't* need a blow-off tube. It gives a very gentle fermentation with a relatively short thick kraeusen. Worts in the 1.050's take 5-6 days. I get the same type of fermentations at 60 F or 72 F. It does take this yeast a little while to clear. I find it clears faster in the bottle than in the secondary, so I only use a secondary for a few days as my "dry hop tun". Specifics: Primary Ferment: 7 days Secondary Ferment: 5 days 33

American I.P.A.

Back to menu Source: Jim Busch (ncdstest@nssdca.gsfc.nasa.gov) Digest: 2/13/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash in at 123 degrees for 30 minutes. Raise to 153 degrees for 60 minutes. Mash off at 172 for 10 minutes. Ferment at 60-68 degrees. Dry hop with 1 ounce whole Cascades, preferably in secondary but primary will work. Comments: Think Liberty on this one. Enjoy. 34

Taking Liberty Ale

Back to menu Source: Rick Larson (rick.larson@adc.com) Digest: Issue #823, 2/13/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash all grains for 90 minutes at 150 F, adjust PH as needed. Mashed off at 170F, sparged with 170F water. This has a total BU of 43.7. If you don't reach around 1.060, adjust the dry hopping accordingly. Comments: In the 1990 Special Zymurgy Issue on Hops, Quentin B. Smith recommends Chinook at 24 BU, Cascade at 12 BU, Cascade at 9 dry hopped (total 45BU). OG=1.062. Later, he wins first place in the Pale Ale catagory in the 1991 AHA Nationals with a recipe that uses 14 pounds Klages, 4 oz 40L crystal, 4 oz 90L crystal (and of course different hops :-). This had a OG=1.062 and TG=1.010. He mashed all grains for 90 minutes at 150F. Mashed off at 170F, sparged with 170F water. 35

Snail Trail Pale Ale

Back to menu Source: Josh Grosse (joshua.grosse@amail.amdahl.com) Digest: Issue #824, 2/14/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash Pale malt at 153 F for 30-60 minutes. Test after 30 minutes. Add Crystal and Carapils and mash-out at 168 F for 10 minutes. Sparge. Bring to boil. In a saucepan, boil the oak for no more than 10 minutes, then strain the liquid into your boiling kettle. Boil the wort, adding boil- ing hops after 30 minutes and the flavor hops and Irish Moss after 75 minutes. Chill and pitch a quart of 1059 starter. Dry hop in the secondary fermenter. The beer will clear in the bottle. Comments: I've been busy trying to make the perfect IPA. Here's my latest recipe. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.056 Final Gravity: 1.022 Primary Ferment: 7 days Secondary Ferment: 5 days 36

Full Sail Ale

Back to menu Source: Gene Schultz (gschultz@cheetah.llnl.gov) Digest: Issue #825, 2/17/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Crack and steep crystal malt at 155 - 170 F for about 45 minutes in 1/2 gallon of water. Add extract, gypsum, dextrin and 2 gallons of water. Bring to boil, then add 1 3/4 oz. hops. Boil for 45 minutes, then add 1/2 oz. hops at the end of the boil for 15 minutes. Comments: About four years ago I ordered a bottle of Full Sail Ale while having lunch in Portland, Oregon. Full Sail was the most expensive beer on the menu, and I figured that at $2.75 a bottle I didn't have much to lose. Several others who were with me did the same, and were pleasantly surprized---Full Sail offers a reasonably complex (a hint of sweetness along with medium strong hops and a rich malty flavor) taste and aroma in a medium-bodied ale. Since I first tasted this ale, I had to rely on others making trips to the Northwest to bring back six packs of this ale. A few months ago, I visited the Hood River Brewing Company in Hood River, Oregon. I was able to get enough information to experiment with a homebrew recipe for Full Sail Ale. My first experiment turned out remarkably similar to the real thing in body, aroma, and flavor. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.045 Final Gravity: 1.020 Primary Ferment: 3--5 days Secondary Ferment: 7--14 days 37

Bass-Alike

Back to menu Source: Herb Peyerl (Herb.Peyerl@novatel.cuc.ab.ca) Digest: 2/24/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: This is a 5 gallon batch. Boil up a couple of gallons of water, add DME and LME, fuggles, and 1 ounce of goldings. Make tea out of roast barley, and strain into main boiler. Make tea out of crystal malt and strain into main boiler. (Half way through boil add local water ingredients and Irish moss if required). After boil, add 1/2 ounce of Goldings, cover and let stand for 15 minutes. Pour into primary, make up to 5 gallons and pitch yeast. Rack and add 1/4 ounce Goldings and complete fermentation. Comments: This was a little hoppy for my taste. I'd probably cut out the 1/4 ounce of Goldings at the end... Other than that, it made an incredible likeness of Bass ale and have had several friends comment on how much like Bass it really is... Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.031 Final Gravity: 1.010 Primary Ferment: 4 days Secondary Ferment: 2 months (I was too lazy to bottle) 38

Brewhaus I.P.A.

Back to menu Source: Ron Downer, Brewhaus Ingredients:
Procedure: Spread 2-row Klages on cookie sheet and toast at 350 degrees until reddish brown in color. Mash grain in 12 quarts mash water (treated with gypsum and lactic acid) at 154 degrees until conversion is complete. Sparge with 170 degree water to collect 6 gallons. Bring wort to boil and boil for 15 minutes before adding hops. Add 1/2 of boiling hops. Boil for 30 minutes and add remaining boiling hops. Boil for another 45 minutes and add Irish moss. Boil for a final 30 minutes. Total boiling time is 2 hours. Cut heat, add aromatic hops, and let rest for 15 minutes, or until trub has settled. Force cool wort to yeast pitching temperature. Transfer to primary fermenter and pitch yeast. Add dry hops at end of primary fer- mentation. Transfer to clean, sterile carboy when fermentation is complete. Boil oak chips for one minute to sterilize and add chips and gelatin to carboy. Age until desired oak flavor is achieved. Allow bottled beer to age two weeks before consuming. Comments: This beer is best when consumed young. It will acquire a drier character as it ages. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.058 39

Draught Bass

Back to menu Source: Pete Young (pyoung%axion.bt.co.uk) Digest: Issue #596, 3/14/91 Ingredients (for 5 Imperial gallons):
Procedure: Raise the temperature of the water to 60C and stir in the crushed malts. Stirring continuously, raise the mash temperature up to 66C. Leave for 1 1/2 hours, occasionally returning the temperature back to this value. Contain the mashed wort in a large grain bag to retrieve the sweet wort. Using slightly hotter water than the mash, rinse the grains to collect 4 gallons (UK) (20 litres) of extract. Boil the extract with the fuggles hops and the first batch of goldings for 1 1/2 hours. Dissolve the main batch of sugar in a little hot water and add this during the boil. Also pitch in the Irish moss as directed on the instructions. Switch off the heat, stir in the second batch of goldings and allow them to soak for 20 mins. Strain off the clear wort into a fermenting bin and top up to the final quantity with cold water. When cool to room temperature add the yeast. Ferment 4-5 days until the specific gravity falls to 1012 and rack into gallon jars or a 25 litre polythene cube. Apportion gelatine finings and the rest of the dry hops before fitting airlocks. Leave for 7 days before racking the beer from the sediment into a primed pressure barrel or polythene cube. Allow 7 days before sampling. Comments: Gallons are British Imperial gallons, which equal 1.2 U.S. gallons. Quantities will need to be adjusted if you use U.S. gallons. The recipe comes from Dave Line's Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy. Water for bitter brewing means hard water. If you're on soft water (your kettle doesn't fur up) then add some water treatment salts or even a couple of spoonfulls of plaster of paris. Invert sugar is sugar that has been cooked for a couple of minutes over 40 'orrible white granulated.) I use isinglass finings instead of Gelatine, it's less messy and does the same job (slightly more expensive though). Isinglass apparently comes from the sexual organs of certain fish. Makes you wonder what else the ancient brewers tried! Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.045 41