Stout and Porter

Recipe Menu


Oatmeal Stout

Back to menu Source: Patrick Stirling (pms@sfsun.West.Sun.COM) Digest: Issue #572, 1/29/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Crack all grains (except oats), add to 2 gallons cold water, add oats, bring to boil. Remove grains with strainer when boil is reached. Add malt extract and boiling hops. Boil 60 minutes. Add finishing hops and boil another minute or so. Remove from heat, let steep 15 minutes. Put 4-6 inches of ice in bottom of plastic fermenter and strain wort into fermenter. Sparge. Bring volume to 5-1/4 gallons and mix. The tempera- ture should now be below 80 degrees. Rack to 6 gallon glass carboy and pitch yeast. Bottle when fermentation is done (about 2-3 weeks). Comments: I really liked this beer! Dark and smooth with a creamy mouth feel. No specific oatmeal flavor, but lots of body. Light brown head. The only problem I had was that after about 3 months in the bottle it developed a distinct off flavor. Could be from the ice, or maybe it got oxygenated during bottling. Specifics: Primary Ferment: 2--3 weeks 80

Mackeson's Stout

Back to menu Source: Marty Albini (hplabs!hpsd139!martya) Digest: Issue #244, 9/1/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Treat the water with 1/4 ounce of magnesium sulfate and 1 ounce of com- mon salt. Crush all grains and mash in 2 gallons of water at 165 degrees for 2 hours. Sparge with 2 gallons of 170 degree water. A few drops of caramel may be added at this stage if proper color has not been suf- ficiently achieved. Boil 1-1/2 hours with hops and sugar. Bring to 5 gallons, pitch yeast when at correct temperature. This recipe can be brewed at an O.G. of 1.045 by adding 1/4 pound of dark extract. May also add 1/4 pound of lactose in boil to provide a slightly higher gravity and a sweeter palate. Comments: This recipe is based on one presented by Bob Pritchard in his book All About Beer. He also advocates adding saccharine. In digest #245, Doug Roberts said that he made this beer and did not like the results. He said, "I will never again make a batch with brown sugar as an ingredient (a little honey or molasses, perhaps, but not caramelized refined sugar). The recipe absolutely no resemblance to thick, rich, sweet Mackeson. It was a thin, cidery sorry imitation." Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.040 Final Gravity: 1.008-1.010 81

Mackeson's Stout

Back to menu Source: Marty Albini (hplabs!hpsd139!martya) Digest: Issue #244, 9/1/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Boil hops in 20 pints of water for 1 hour. Strain and dissolve extract, caramel and sugar. Boil for 15 minutes. Bring to 5 gallons, pitch yeast at correct temperature. As in the previous recipe, this can be brought to a gravity of 1.045 by increasing the extract by 1/4 pound, and lactose may also be added. A few drops of caramel may be added at this stage if sufficient color has not been achieved. Saccharine can be added at bottling to increase apparent sweetness. Comments: I haven't tried either of these, and I'm not about to go adding saccharin to my beer, so you're on your own from here. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.040 Final Gravity: 1.008-1.010 82

Basic Stout

Back to menu Source: Marc San Soucie (mds@wang.wang.com) Digest: Issue #219, 8/3/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: To these skeleton ingredients I add other adjuncts, or remove things if the wind blows from the south. A nice beer is made by using only dark malt and black patent malt. A good strong bittering hops is key; Bullion is lovely, as are Nugget or Chinook. There are no appreciable differences between making stouts and other ales, save the larger quantities of grain. Beware of 9-pound batches as these can blow the lids off fermenters. Comments: There are scads of other additives that can lobbed into a stout without damaging it. Almost anything works when making stout, but matching your own taste preference is a matter of experimentation. Be prepared though to give up drinking commercial bottled stouts, because frankly, nothing can match the taste of homemade. 83

Crying Over Spilt Stout

Back to menu Source: Darryl Richman (darryl@ism.isc.com) Digest: Issue #220, 8/4/89 Ingredients (for 15 gallons):
Procedure: This recipe makes 15 gallons. Give the beer a lot of temporary hardness (e.g., lots of carbonate). Comments: I would not leave flaked barley out of a stout. This is what gives Guinness its creamy white head and rounds out the body. This beer will have a rich creamy body with a balanced bitterness. It is very dark, but not opaque. It makes a great substitute for your morning coffee. The name refers to a huge tragedy. I was filling carboys and rocking them to knock down the head. I must have rolled one over a pebble because there came a distinct click noise and beer poured everywhere. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.048 84

David Smith's Porter

Back to menu Source: David Smith, posted by Russ Pencin (parcplace!pencin@ Sun.COM) Digest: Issue #223, 8/9/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Add crushed black patent malt to 1-1/2 gallons cold water. Bring to boil. (This recipe was made by boiling malt for 10 minutes, however, conventional wisdom is to avoid boiling whole grains). Strain out malt. Add extract and dry malt and Cascade and 1/2 ounce Tettnanger hops. Boil 60 minutes. Add finishing hops and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat and steep 1-2 minutes. Sparge into 3-1/2 gallons cold water. Cool and pitch yeast. Comments: This recipe was modified from Papazian's "Sparrow Hawk Porter" and won first place at the Santa Clara County Fair. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.056 at 60 degrees Final Gravity: 1.024 85

Mackeson Triple Stout Clone

Back to menu Source: Doug Roberts (dzzr@lanl.gov) Digest: Issue #229, 8/15/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Bring extract syrup and enough water to make 3 gallons to boil. Add crystal malt. Boil 10 minutes. Add hops. Boil 5 minutes. Turn off heat. Add chocolate and black patent malt in grain bag. Steep 10 minutes. Sparge grain bag with 2 gallons boiling water. Add lactose. Pitch yeast and ferment. When bottling, prime with malt extract. Comments: It took me three tries, but I finally got a batch that was closer to the original Mackeson sweet stout than I could have hoped for. It was wonderful! After aging about three months, it was as wonderfully smooth, dark, and sweet as the real Mackeson. Maybe better. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.057 Final Gravity: 1.022 Secondary Ferment: 5-6 weeks 86

Oatmeal Stout

Back to menu Source: Patrick Stirling (pms@Corp.Sun.COM) Digest: Issue #493, 9/11/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Crack grains using a rolling pin. Add grain and oats to 2 gallons cold water. Bring to boil. Strain out grains. Add extract and Eroica hops. Boil about 1 hour. Add Fuggles and boil an additional 2 minutes. Steep 15 minutes. Sparge through sieve over ice. Mix. Rack to 7-gallon carboy and pitch yeast. Bottle when fermentation is complete (about 1 week). Comments: This was one of my best beers yet. Black, smooth and creamy. The oatmeal doesn't add a very pronounced flavor; I think it rather contributes to the creaminess and smoothness, which is becoming more pronounced as the beer ages. It has a fairly dark brown head, presumably from roasted barley---creamy with small bubbles. This recipe was derived from several posted by Jay H. in digest #459. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.062 Final Gravity: 1.015 Primary Ferment: 1 week 87

Halloween Stout

Back to menu Source: Alex Jenkins (atj@mirror.tmc.com) Digest: Issue #57, 1/24/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash malts in 2-1/2 gallons of 170 degree water; 154 degrees, h 5.2, maintain at 140-150 degrees for 90 minutes. (Ending pH as 4.8.). Sparge and bring to boil. Add dark extract. Add Clusters and Hallertauer hops 20 minutes into boil. Add Irish Moss after another 10 minutes. Add Willamette hops in last 15 minutes. Cool wort and add to carboy. Pitch yeast. Set carboy in cool basement with blow tube. On second day, re- place blow tube with airlock. Bottled after 29 days. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.044 Final Gravity: 1.014 Primary Ferment: 29 days 88

Cream of Oats Stout

Back to menu Source: Glenn Colon-Bonet (gcb@hpfigcb.hp.com) Digest: Issue #412, 5/4/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash in 3 quarts cold water. Raise temperature to 153 degrees and hold until iodine test indicates complete conversion. Transfer to lauter tun and sparge to yield 7 gallons. Boil 1 hour, adding boiling hops. Add finishing hops and Irish moss in last 10 minutes. Sparge, cool and pitch yeast. Comments: Very smooth, silky mouth feel. Great flavor, nice sweetness with mild roasted malt flavors. Somewhat thin for style. Will use ale malt next time. Could also use more dextrin and pale malt and possibly mash at higher temperature. Overall, a very nice beer! Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.040 Final Gravity: 1.015 Primary Ferment: 7 days Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks 89

Russian Empirical Stout

Back to menu Source: Rob Bradley (bradley@dehn.math.nwu.edu) Digest: Issue #417, 5/15/90 Ingredients (for 3--1/2 gallons):
Procedure: This will yield about 3-1/2 gallons at a density of 1106. Mash grains using infusion method for about 1 hour. Boil two hours with all hops added---that's right, no finishing hops. Cool and pitch Williams yeast. Ferment for 4 days then rack to glass jugs. Rack again on 24th day. Add champagne yeast. Let ferment another 4 months. Bottle. Comments: After two years this beer showed a little oxidation, but by and large it was till in excellent shape. Viscous and black with light carbonation and a fine-beaded medium-brown head, it still had good balance, although the hop bitterness had faded with time to give predominance to the dark malts. It was bittersweet and almost unbelievably long in the finish. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.106 Final Gravity: 1.032 Primary Ferment: 4 days Secondary Ferment: 24 days + 4 months 90

Oatmeal Wheat Stout

Back to menu Source: Don Wegeng (Wegeng.Henr@Xerox.COM) Digest: Issue #95, 3/10/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Crush pale and crystal malt. Loosely crush black patent malt. Place oatmeal in cheesecloth. Mash all except 2 cups of the black patent malt for 1-1/2 hours. Add diastatic enzyme. Sparge and begin boil. Add ex- tracts and licorice. After 15 minutes of boil, add 1 ounce Tettnanger and continue boil. After another 15 minutes, add 1/2 ounce Hallertauer. During last 15 minutes, add Irish moss and 2 cups black patent malt. During last 2 minutes of boil add 1 ounce Hallertauer. Cool rapidly and pitch yeast. Ferment in 5-gallon carboy with blow tube attached. Proceed with normal single-stage fermentation. Comments: This recipe was developed by Kenneth Kramer who published it in the June 1986 issue of All About Beer magazine. I won't comment on the choice of hops. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.078 Final Gravity: 1.032 91

Mega Stout

Back to menu Source: rogerl@Think.COM Digest: Issue #101, 3/15/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep whole grains in 6 cups of water and bring to boil. Remove grains at boil. Add extract and boiling hops. Boil 1 hour. Add Irish moss in last 15 minutes. After boil add Cascade hops and steep 15 minutes. Cool and pitch yeast. Comments: This recipe was developed by Doug Hinderks, president of the Northern Ale Stars Homebrewers Guild. The recipe was used as the basis for "Ursa Stout," which follows. Ursa differs in the addition of pale, crystal, and dextrin malts in place of some of the dry extract. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.071 Final Gravity: 1.020 92

Ursa Major Stout

Back to menu Source: rogerl@Think.COM Digest: Issue #101, 3/15/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash grains in 1-2 gallons of water. Sparge with enough water to end with 2-3 gallons in pot. Bring to boil. Stir in extract and bring to boil. Add boiling hops. Boil 40 minutes. Add Irish moss in last 15 min- utes. At end of boil, add aromatic hops and steep 15 minutes. Sparge into primary with enough water to make 6 gallons. Cool and pitch yeast. Rack to secondary when initial blow off subsides. Prime and bottle about a month later. Comments: This brew is so dark I think the Irish moss may be superfluous. This was the most active brew I've had in a while. Expect to use some sort of blow off method for primary and then rack to secondary with an airlock. Very black! Thick, but not as much as Guinness. Well rounded flavor and smooth with almost no bite. Very dark head. Maybe using less roast bar- ley and a bit more black patent would lighten the head and keep the body from suffering. Everybody who tasted it really like it. I do believe I've found my house stout. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.058 Final Gravity: 1.016 93

Porter

Back to menu Source: Gary Benson (inc@tc.fluke.COM) Digest: Issue #124, 4/11/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Make toasted barley into a tea. Bring flaked barley to boil. Sparge with kitchen strainer and boiling water. Boil extracts and Cascade hops. Add Northern Brewer. Cool and Pitch. Comments: This makes what I consider to be an excellent porter. Fermentation seemed to take off and I bottled within 7 days of brewing. Fermentation took place at 74 degrees. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.045 Final Gravity: 1.005 Primary Ferment: 2 days Secondary Ferment: 5 days 94

Dextrinous Porter

Back to menu Source: Peter Klausler (pmk@bedlam.cray.com) Digest: Issue #177, 6/16/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash grains. Add boiling hops and boil 90 minutes. Dry hop with 1/2 ounce Cascade. Comments: My mash temp was too high, as I misjudged the quantity of strike liquor and the mash spent a lot of time in the 160-170 degree range before I brought it down to 154 degrees. Conversion was good (1.048 for 5 gallons), but now after fermentation slowed to 1 bubble every 2 minutes, the gravity is 1.024. I suspect there's nothing I can do to turn this sweet porter into the dry porter I intended so my question is, "Is there some style I can claim to have intended in the first place?" I guess I need some level of plausible brewability. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.048 Final Gravity: 1.024 95

Crankcase Stout

Back to menu Source: Marc San Soucie (hplabs!decvax!wang!mds) Digest: Issue #178, 6/16/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Put grains into two gallons water and boil. When pot reaches boil, re- move grains. Add dry extract and stir. Add hopped extract and licorice. Add Nugget and Galena hops. Boil 70 minutes. This was a big thick mess and needs a big pot---mine boiled over. Add Cascade for finishing. Cool and pitch yeast and amylase. Put in a big fermenter with a blow tube--- my batch blew the cover creating a marvelous mess all over the wall. Eventually rack to secondary and ferment a long time (at least 3 weeks). Comments: An experiment in extravagance. Intimidating. Heavy, strong, thick. Not really drinkable after 4 months. Interesting, but not completely enjoyable. Too much of too many good things. Specifics: Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks + 96

Tina Marie Porter

Back to menu Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%studguppy@lanl.gov) Digest: Issue #378, 3/15/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: The mash was done based on Papazian's temperature-controlled method. The boiling hops used were Northern Brewer and Cascade, but other hops can be used, this recipe uses 10.75 AAUs. The finishing hops are added after the boil and steep while cooling with an immersion chiller. The Irish moss is added in the last 20 minutes of the boil. The yeast is rehy- drated in 1/2 cup of 100 degree water. Comments: This was a marvelous bitter-sweet velvet black porter. 97

Baer's Stout

Back to menu Source: Michael Eldridge (dredge@hitchcock.Stanford.EDU) Digest: Issue #380, 3/20/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep flaked barley and crystal malt for 50 minutes at 153 degrees. Strain and boil 90 minutes. Add 1/3 of boiling hops after 30 minutes. Add black patent and molasses at 45 minutes. After 60 minutes add 1/3 of boiling hops. At end of boil add remaining hops. Steep. Strain, cool, and ferment. Comments: This is based on one of the excellent recipes from Dave Baer (from this digest). This one came out great! Apologies to Dave for what we may have done to the original. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.051 Final Gravity: 1.018 98

Black Cat Stout #1

Back to menu Source: Mark Stevens (stevens@stsci.edu) Digest: Issue #349, 2/1/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Brew a pot of coffee with 1/2 cup of French roast coffee. Steep special- ty grains in water as it boils. Remove grains. Boil malts, hops, and vanilla 60 minutes. Strain wort into fermenter. Pour in pot of coffee. Add ice water to make 5 gallons. Pitch yeast. Rack to secondary after 3 days. Bottle 23 days later. Comments: This stout turned out pretty tasty and the coffee flavor seems to come through more in the aftertaste with the predominant flavor being the dark malts. I should probably have let it ferment in the secondary a bit longer or not used anything for priming because I got a few gushers after a couple months---but by then, most of the beer was gone anyway. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.069 Final Gravity: 1.028 Primary Ferment: 3 days Secondary Ferment: 23 days 99

Colorado Crankcase Stout

Back to menu Source: Tom Hotchkiss (trh@hpestrh.hp.com) Digest: Issue #352, 2/6/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep grains in water while heating. Remove grains just before boiling. During boil, add licorice and extract. Add 1 ounce of Brewer's Gold for 60 minutes, 1 ounce for 45 minutes, and 1 ounce of Fuggles for 30 min- utes. Cool wort and pitch yeast. Add unground coffee beans and remaining ounce of Fuggles. The next day skim off all crud, including coffee beans and hops. One day later, rack to secondary. Ferment three weeks and bottle. Comments: Wyeast #1028 does not seem to have high attenuation, causing high final gravity. After 1 month in bottles, the beer has low carbonation levels. I like it this way! The beer feels thick and sweet. If you want a good sweet stout, like Mackeson, this recipe with Wyeast #1028 is a good way to go. This stuff is black! When you pour a bottle, it sucks all the light out of the room...you have to drink it in the dark. Amazingly, there isn't much hops aroma and taste, but with so many other flavors and aromas, you don't miss it. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.065 Final Gravity: 1.026 Primary Ferment: 2 days Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks 100

Martin's Porter

Back to menu Source: Martin Lodahl (pbmoss!mal@hplabs.HP.com) Digest: Issue #315, 12/4/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash-in 3 minutes in 6 quarts of water at 122 degree (strike heat 126 degree). Adjust pH to 5.0-5.5. Protein rest 30 minutes at 131 degrees. Starch conversion 60 minutes at 150-141 degrees (longer is better). Mash out 5 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparge with 2 gallons of water at 168-160 degrees. Boil 60 minutes. Add extract, yeast nutrient and bittering hops at start of boil. Add finishing hops 10 minutes before boil ends. Force cool and bring volume to 5 gallons. Pitch yeast. Comments: If this beer doesn't have enough body, you might try substituting unmalted barley for the wheat malt and extend starch conversion rest to 2 hours. Bitterness can be reduced by cutting back bittering hops to 8 AAUs or so. 101

Double Stout

Back to menu Source: Chip Hitchcock (cjh@ileaf.com) Digest: Issue #520, 10/18/90 Ingredients (for 2--1/2 gallons):
Procedure: This is a 2-1/2 gallon recipe. Steep the grains 30 minutes in 1 quart of 150 degree water. Strain out grains and bring liquid up to 3 quarts. Add stout kit, amber malt, gypsum and boil 45 minutes. After 15 minutes of boiling, add Irish moss. After removing from heat, steep Fuggles hops pellets for 4 minutes. Strain into ice water and pitch yeast. Comments: This recipe is based on the Double Stout recipe that appeared in Zymurgy magazine, but the quantities have been adjusted to make a half batch. 102

Chocolate Point Porter

Back to menu Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%studguppy@lanl.gov) Digest: Issue #269, 10/2/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Place chocolate, patent, and crystal malts in about 2 gallons of water and bring to almost boil, Sparge into boiling pot. Add 2 more gallons of water. Bring to boil and add bittering hops. 30 minutes into the boil, add 1/2 teaspoon Irish moss. Boil one more hour. Add finishing hops in last 2 minutes of boil. Pour into fermenter and add coffee. Pitch yeast. 103

Partial Mash Porter

Back to menu Source: Martin Lodahl (mal@pbmoss.pacbell.com) Digest: Issue #274, 10/10/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash-in (6 quarts water) at 131-122 degrees, stir 3 minutes. Adjust pH to 5.0-5.5 (using calcium carbonate or gypsum). Protein rest 131-120 degrees for 30 minutes. Starch conversion 155 degrees for 60 minutes. Mash out at 168 degrees for 5 minutes. Sparge with 2 gallons of 168-160 degree water. Bring liquid to boil and add extract and hops. Boil 60 minutes. Comments: The result is sweet, but very tasty. My next batch of porter will be somewhat drier, tending toward stout. Changes will include a less sweet extract (Scottish light), dropping the crystal malt altogether, bumping the bittering hops up a point, adding an ounce of Fuggles 10 minutes before the end of the boil for finish, and going to Edme yeast, which I believe to be more attenuative. I'm also toying with the idea of adding 8 ounces of wheat malt to improve the head, which is the only real defect this beer seems to have. 104

Stout

Back to menu Source: Allen Hainer (ajhainer@violet.waterloo.edu) Digest: Issue #281, 10/18/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: The bullion hops are added 30 minutes into the boil. I used pelletized hops and there was a huge amount of sediment when I racked it---not sediment in the normal sense---it was mostly beer with hops floating in it, but it was too thick to go through the siphon. Comments: This is better than any stout I have ever tasted. It is based on the stout recipe posted by Marc San Soucie in Digest #219. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.075 Final Gravity: 1.035 105

All Grain Porter

Back to menu Source: Doug Roberts (roberts%studguppy@lanl.gov) Digest: Issue #296, 11/4/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Use Papazian's temperature-controlled mash procedure. Sparge and boil. Comments: This recipes is based on Papazian's "Silver Dollar Porter." I suspect the difference in quality between this batch and an extract batch is going to be the difference between fresh-brewed coffee and instant. The wort had a much better hot and cold break than I've ever experienced using extracts, and it tasted better too. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.051 106

Sweet Darkness

Back to menu Source: Marty Albini (martya@hp-sdd@hplabs.csnet) Digest: Issue #298, 11/8/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: Bring the wort to boil (water and syrup to make 3 gallons), then add crystal. Boil 10 minutes, then add hops. Boil 5 minutes. Turn off heat and add chocolate and black patent malt in a grain bag. Steep about 10 minutes. Sparge grain bag with about 2 gallons of boiling water. Add lactose. Chill and pitch. When fermented, try priming with 3/4 cup of light dry malt extract. Comments: This is based on Doug Roberts' Mackeson Triple clone. This will be lighter than the real Mackeson's with a lighter head. Very similar aromas and head retention. Overall a resounding success. One or two things I'll do different next time: Reduce black patent malt to 1/2 cup (crushed), add a bit of dextrin to increase body, and maybe add a touch of roasted barley. I recommend this to anyone who likes their coffee strong, with cream and sugar. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.057 Final Gravity: 1.022 107

Broglio's Quaker Stout

Back to menu Source: Jim Broglio (microsoft!jamesb@uunet.uu.net) Digest: Issue #334, 12/29/89 Ingredients:
Procedure: In two gallons of cold water, add crystal, barley, and oatmeal. Steep until water comes to boil. Sparge with about 1 gallon of hot water. Add dry extract. Bring to boil. Add Eroica hops. Boil 45 minutes. In last 5 minutes of boil, add Kent Goldings hops. Cool to about 75 degrees. Transfer to primary and pitch yeast. Have a homebrew and wait. Comments: This is very lightly carbonated, but that I can live with. Could use more hops. Smooth aftertaste. Overall, I give it a thumbs up. 108

Original Oatmeal Stout

Back to menu Source: Jay Hersch (75140.350@compuserve.com) Digest: Issue #459, 7/14/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: This is the first of a series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts. It is an extract brew, with any specialty grains (not in this particular recipe) being added in the standard stovetop method and removed at boil. When grains are used, they are cracked with a rolling pin and boiled for 30 minutes before straining. Comments: These recipes rank among my best beers. This one probably had the most noticeable oat flavor of all the variations due to the balance between the amount of malt and oats. It had a nice deep dark head, opaque color and smooth creamy flavor. I'd probably use an Irish liquid ale yeast or Whitbread if I did this again. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.042 Final Gravity: 1.021 109

Second Try

Back to menu Source: Jay Hersh (75140.350@compuserve.com) Digest: Issue #459, 7/14/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: This is the second of a series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts. It is an extract brew, with specialty grains being added using the standard stovetop method and removed at boil. When grains are used, they are cracked with a rolling pin and boiled for 30 minutes before strain- ing. The finishing hops are added in the last 5 minutes of the boil. Comments: The addition of grains made the oatmeal less noticeable. Color and hop balance were good again. Irish ale yeast could yield some nice results and I think the steel cut oats need to be bumped up to 1 pound to bring them to the fore. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.050 Final Gravity: 1.022 110

Not So Oatmeal

Back to menu Source: Jay Hersch (75140.350@compuserve.com) Digest: Issue #459, 7/14/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: This is the third of a series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts. It is an extract brew, with specialty grains being added in the standard stovetop method and removed at boil. Grains are cracked with a rolling pin and boiled for 30 minutes before straining. The finishing hops are added 5 minutes before the end of the boil. The dry hopping is done after 4 days in the primary. Comments: This turned out real fruity, probably because of the Alexander's. Dry hopping also helped, again the amount of steel oats to other grains was too low. To get opaqueness it was necessary to use at least 1-2 pounds of dark malt extract; because I didn't do that, this was more of a brown ale in color and body. Specifics: Final Gravity: 1.018 111

Most Recent Oatmeal Stout

Back to menu Source: Jay Hersch (75140.350@compuserve.com) Digest: Issue #459, 7/14/90 Ingredients:
Procedure: Last in the series of experiments in brewing oatmeal stouts. It is an extract brew, with specialty grains being added in the standard stove- top method and removed at boil. Grains are cracked with a rolling pin and boiled for 30 minutes before straining. The Sticklbrackt are added in 1/2 ounce batches at 20 minute intervals, the Bullion 1/2 ounce at a time in between the Sticklbrackt. The finishing hops are added 5 minutes before the end of the boil. The dry hopping is done in the primary. Comments: Darker and more astringent than the other recipes, also more boldly hopped but still well-balanced due to the higher gravity. A little like Xingu or Mackesons with its residual sweetness. Specifics: Final Gravity: 1.030 112

Mocha Java Stout

Back to menu Source: Guy McConnel (ingr!b11!mspe5!guy@ uunet.UU.NET) Digest: Issue #814, 1/31/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Brew coffee using 2 scoops coffee to 12 oz. cold water. Steep flaked barley and cracked black patent for 45 minutes. Bring 1.5 gallons water to a boil in brewpot, sparge in grains, and add extract and boiling hops. Boil for 50 minutes. Add chocolate and flavoring hops and boil for 10 more minutes. Remove from heat and carefully stir in coffee. Cool and pour into fermenter containing 3 gallons cold (pre-boiled) water. Pitch yeast. Rack to secondary when vigorous fermentation subsides. Bottle with 3/4 cup corn sugar. Comments: The "Monte Sano blend" coffee is a mild coffee (sorry I can't remember exactly which coffees are blended to make this) that I buy locally in a coffee store. I wanted something mild for the first attempt so as not to overdo it. This beer turned out wonderfully black and the chocolate and coffee come out nicely in the aroma and flavor. In spite of the oils in the chocolate, it has a rich, creamy head that stays with it until the bottom of the glass. The low hopping rate is due to the fact that both the coffee and the chocolate add to the bitterness and I wanted their aromas to dominate this beer. It has been well received by all who have tried it. I called it "Three Passions Stout" because three of my favor- ite tastes (from the world of food and beverages anyway) are chocolate, coffee, and stout---not necessarily in that order. I have set aside two six-packs of this to see how well it ages (if I can leave it alone, that is). 113

Alcatraz Porter

Back to menu Source: Bryan Gros (bgros@sensitivity.berkeley.edu) Digest: Issue #815, 2/3/92 Ingredients (for 3 gallons):
Procedure: Add all grains, crushed, to 6qts water at 55C. Wait 30 min. Raise temp to 62C (Added 2qts boiling water) Wait 75 min. Raise temp to 75C. Wait 5 min. Sparge with 75C water. Bring to boil, add molasses, Cascade, and Mt. Hood hops. Boil one hour. Add finishing hops. Boil 5 min. Cool down in sink. Add yeast from starter. Comments: I recently tasted my all-grain porter against Anchor's and the big thing I notice was Anchor Porter is thick, creamy. Mine is low carbonated, but it does not have that creamy feel. This was my first all-grain brew and my first porter. It has a good malt flavor. Next time I would cut back on the hops some. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.054 Final Gravity: 1.010 Primary Ferment: 10 days 114

Speedball Stout

Back to menu Source: Stephen E. Hansen (hansen@gloworm.Stanford.EDU) Digest: Issue #747, 10/24/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep flaked barley and crystal malt for 50 minutes at 153 degrees. Boil for 90 minutes. Add black patent malt and molasses at 45 minutes. Bittering hops in thirds each 30 min. Fill a hops bag with the coffee and aromatic hops and add to the hot wort just before chilling. If you don't have a wort chiller you'd better wait until pitching. Remove the bag after about 24 hours or when the fermentation is going strong, whichever is longer. Rack to secondary once initial fermentation has died down, about 5 to 6 days. Comments: The last couple of times I've left the bag of coffee beans and hops until racking without over doing the coffee flavor. This cuts down on the potential for contamination. We've been using a Sierra Nevada yeast culture for the last few batches and it's been a very nice brew. Pre- started Wyeast British Ale yeast has worked well also. Sierra Nevada yeast culture is not terribly attenuative and the last batch was a bit sweeter than I'd prefer. Next time I'll use Wyeast's Irish Stout Yeast that Florian and others have recommended. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.049--1.051 Final Gravity: 1.017--1.020 Primary Ferment: 5--6 days at 55 degrees 115

Mach Guinness

Back to menu Source: Kevin L. Scoles (kscoles@pnet51.orb.mn.org) Digest: Issue #646, 5/28/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash 5 pounds 2-row, rolled barley and roasted barley in at 132 degrees. Protein rest 30 minutes. Starch Conversion 2 hours at 153 degrees. Mashed out 15 minutes at 168 degrees. Sparged with 4 gallons 172 degree water. Add the 2 pounds dry ME and the 2 cups sugar. Bring to a boil. Add 1 1/2 ounces of hops. Boil 1 hour. Add 1/2 ounce of hops, turn off heat, and let stand for 15 minutes. Cool wort to 72 degrees, strain into fermenter, and pitch yeast. Bottling: one to two days before bottling, sour two bottles of ale. To do this, pour two bottles of ale into a steril glass container. Cover with a clean cloth secured with string or rubber band. Put in the cup- board (or somewhere relatively dark and warm) and let stand one to two days. It should sour, but not mold. Add 2/3 cup corn sugar to the sour ale and boil for 10 minutes. Pour into bottling bucket. Add sour ale and bottle as usual. Comments: This stout is creamy, but not as heavey as some, with a head that takes almost 30 seconds to form, lightly bitter, with that back of the throat sourness from the soured ale. Specifics: Primary Ferment: 7 days Secondary Ferment: 6 to 9 days Original Gravity: 1.066 Final Gravity: 1.016 116

Lutzen's Pleasing Porter

Back to menu Source: Karl Lutzen (lutzen@apollo.physics.umr.edu) Digest: Issue #700, 8/13/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Bring 2 gallons of water and malt to a boil. Add 1/2 ounce Clusters at beginning of boil, 20 minutes, and 40 minutes. After 60 min. turn off heat, and add Cascades. At this point it was late in the evening, I poured the wort into my sanitized bottling bucket and brought the quan- tity up to 5 gals. and stuck the whole thing in the beverage refrigera- tor. Next morning I siphoned off the wort into the fermentor, leaving all those hop particles behind, pitched the yeast. Put on the blow off tube, and put the fermenter back in the refrigerator. I had the tempera- ture set at 50 degrees. After a week, I replaced the blow tube with an airlock, and bottled after a month of fermenting. Comments: Very smooth, nice hop balance, but a bit heavy for a summer drink. Will try to save the rest for this fall. This might be considered a lager due to the refrigeration. It was only done because the ambient temperature of my basement "brewing room" hits 75-80 Degrees during the summer heat. I brewed this in early spring as an ale (65 degrees) and strangely enough, they taste very similar. (Drink a bottle of one version, wait, drink a bottle of the other, results: Who cares. Both are great.) Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.052 Final Gravity: 1.016 Primary Ferment: 1 month at 50 degrees 117

Double Stout

Back to menu Source: Spencer W. Thomas (Spencer.W.Thomas@med.umich.edu) Digest: Issue #732, 9/26/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Combine water, dark malt extract, and Bullion hops. Boil for 20 minutes. Add black patent malt through Irish moss. Boil for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add Kent Golding hops. Steep for 5 minutes. Cool and add yeast nutrient and ale yeast. When fermentation has "stopped", add priming sugar and bottle. Comments: My batch fermented in about a week (house temperature ranging between 60 and 68). It was barely drinkable after 6 weeks, but delicious after 3 months. It's now been almost 5 years, and the last few bottles are a little faded and mellow but still quite good. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.086 Final Gravity: 1.020 Primary Ferment: 7--11 days 118

Christmas in Ireland

Back to menu Source: Guy D. McConnell (uunet!ingr.com!b11!mspe5!guy) Digest: Issue #727, 9/19/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Simmer honey and spices in covered pot for 45 minutes. Add cracked grains to 2 gallons cold water and bring to a boil. As soon as boiling starts, remove grains with a strainer. Add malt extracts and bittering hops and boil for 55 minutes. Add finishing hops and boil for 5 more minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in honey and spice mixture and cool. Strain into fermenter containing 3 gallons cold (previously boiled) water and pitch yeast (when cool). After vigorous primary fermentation subsides, rack into secondary. Bottle with 7 ounces corn sugar or 1-1/4 cups DME when fermentation completes. Comments: I haven't tried it yet but it smells great. I hope it will become a favorite. Enjoy. 119

All-Grain Stout

Back to menu Source: Brian Bliss (bliss@csrd.uiuc.edu) Digest: Issue #736, 10/2/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: The flaked barley has no husk, so I saw no reason not to grind it finely. Mash in at 130 degrees. Let rest 20 minutes or so. Mash at 150 degrees for 115 minutes. Sparge. Let the spargings settle. What seemed to be 3 or 4" of hot break settled out of the initial spargings! Boil for 2 hours. Add hops as follows: 14 grams bullion and 16 grams cascade (very fresh) for 1:45. 10 g bullion and 14 g cascade for 1:05. 4 grams hallertauer finish. Chill with an immersion chiller, and strain the wort through the hops. Makes about 5.5 gallons of 1.068 wort. Comments: I had 374 out of 450 pt * gals of possible extraction, so an efficiency of about 85%. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.068 Primary Ferment at 65 degrees 120

Stout Stout

Back to menu Source: Russ Gelinas (r_gelinas@unhh.unh.edu) Digest: Issue #740, 10/8/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash in 3 gallons of water at 170 degrees. Starch conversion at about 90 minutes. Mash out. Sparge with 170 degree water. Collect 5 gallons or so. Boil for 60 minutes with hops going it at beginning of boil. 121

Bitch's Brew Oatmeal Stout

Back to menu Source: Peter Glen Berger (pb1p+@andrew.cmu.edu) Digest: Issue #741, 10/9/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep the Oats, and the cracked grains for 1/2 hour in cold water. Heat mixture and remove grains as boil is reached. Throw in malts and make your wort. Boil Bullions for 45 minutes, Willammette for 5-7 minutes. Have fun. Comments: This beer improves substantially after about 2 weeks in the bottle, as hop aroma subsides and the large amount of roasted barley assumes it's place in the forefront. It's my favorite beer to date, but if I were going to brew it again I might cut back on the roasted barley by about or 1.5 ounce of some lower alpha hop). Whitbread ale yeast was used because of the low attenuation rate: this stout is NOT sweet, but has lots and lots of body. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.052 Final Gravity: 1.029 122

Rainy Day Porter

Back to menu Source: Chuck Coronella (coronellrjds@che.utah.edu) Digest: Issue #744, 10/21/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Steep grains at 150 degrees for 40 minutes before boil. Add malt and brown sugar. Boil for 60 minutes. Add Nugget hops at begining of boil. Add ginger last 10 minutes of boil. Turn off heat and add Cascade hops. Allow to steep for 10 minutes. Cool wort with chiller. Rack off trub. Add water to make total about 5.3 gallons. Pitch yeast. Bottle 3 weeks later. Comments: I used two types of yeast pitched simultaneously for this brew. One was 5 grams (rehydrated) Doric Ale yeast, and the other was a "large" sample taken from a previous (cherry ale) brew a few weeks earlier, originally Whitbred Ale yeast. Obviously, this is a very heavy ale, almost like a stout. I'd liken the flavor to Sierra Nevada's porter, but heavier, a little sweeter, and with (delicious) ginger. After about 3 weeks in the bottle, it was, uh, WOW!!! Delicious!! What a combination of flavors! I'd say that this is the correct amount of ginger for such a dark, heavy ale (for my taste). I've had (lighter) ales with too much ginger, but this was just right. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.057 Final Gravity: 1.016 Primary Ferment: 3 weeks 123

Sweetport Porter

Back to menu Source: Mike Ligas (LIGAS@SSCvax.CIS.McMaster.CA) Digest: Issue #743, 10/18/91 Ingredients (for 6 gallons):
Procedure: Crush grains and steep for 30 minutes in water at 158 deg. Strain into boiling vessel and sparge with 158 degrees water. Add malt extracts, dextrin, honey, brown sugar, molasses and gypsum and bring to a boil. Add boiling hops 5 minutes into boil, Irish moss for the last 15 minutes and finishing hops in last 5 minutes. Total boil of 50 minutes. Cool to at least 68 degrees before pitching yeast. Prime with dextrose as usual. Comments: Although I tend towards all grain brewing it seems I always come back to this one as my Porter. The rich body and residual sweetness of this beer is something which I have found hard to replicate in an all grain recipe. This beer finished 2nd at the Canadian Amateur Brewers Association national competition in 1989 and a variation of this recipe finished 3rd in 1990. The yeast strain is critical as well as the molasses to get the most out of this beer. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.066 Final Gravity: 1.025 Primary Ferment: 5 days Secondary Ferment: 3 weeks 124

Black Dwarf Imperial Oatmeal Stout

Back to menu Source: David Klein (paklein@ccit.arizona.edu) Digest: Issue #749, 10/28/91 Ingredients (for 6 gallons):
Procedure: Mash all grain like substances for 1 hour at 130-140 degrees in 2-1/2 gallons water. Add 1-1/2 gallons boiling water to bring to 160 degrees. Hold there for 1-1/2 hours. The high temp is used to get a high final gravity. Sparge with 5 gallons fresh 170 degree water. Bring to a boil, and add Northern Brewers. Boil for 60 minutes. Add Mt. Hood and irish moss 15 minutes before the end of the boil. Cool, place in fermenter and pitch yeast. Dryhop with Hallertau in secondary. Comments: A heavy thick brew. The flavor lasts for upwards of a minute. (hops and dark grains followed by full malt and grain flavor, finishing with molasses. Bit alcoholic tasting when warm. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.090 Final Gravity: 1.032 Primary Ferment: 7 days 125

Josh's Better Xingu

Back to menu Source: joshua.grosse@amail.amdahl.com Digest: Issue #757, 11/7/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Crack and steep specialty grains at 150 degrees for about an hour in 1/2 gal water. Sparge with 1.5 gallons of 165 degree water. Add the extract and gypsum. When boiling, add the hops. Boil for one hour. Add the lac- tose to the boil for the last 15 minutes. Comments: I've tried to duplicate Xingu, but reduce some of the roast barley bite. I think I've succeeded, though I haven't done a side by side comparison. I believe that Xingu is what's known in the UK as a milk stout, as I believe that lactose is used to add body and to very slightly sweeten the flavor. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.042 Final Gravity: 1.021 Primary Ferment: 3-7 days Secondary Ferment: 7-14 days 126

Dark of the Moon Cream Stout

Back to menu Source: Steve Slade (sslade@ucsd.edu) Digest: Issue #764, 11/20/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Made a yeast starter 3 days before pitching. Used 2 tablespoons DME and 1 cup water. Next time use 2 cups water. Crack all grains and steep for 30 minutes at about 160 degrees along with the calcium carbonate. Strain out grains and sparge into about 2-1/2 gallons pre-boiled water. Total boil about 5 gallons. Add dry malt and dextrin and bring to a boil. Add 1/2 ounce of Eroica and 1/4 ounce of Chinook when boil starts. 30 minutes later add 3/4 ounce Nugget hops. Chill with an immersion chiller. Rack to a carboy, fill to 5 gallons and let sit overnight to allow the trub to settle out. The next morning rack it to a plastic primary, pitched the yeast starter, and add the 1 ounce of Cascades and Eroica hops. Comments: I had originally planned for a single stage fermentation, with bottling a week after pitching. However, there was no time to bottle after a week, so I racked to a secondary glass carboy to get the beer out of the primary, which does not seal very well. The dry hopping should have been done in the secondary, but at the time I had no plans for using one. I suspect the hops did not spend much time in contact with the beer in the primary, as they got pushed up by the krausen and stuck to the walls. When I bottled 2 weeks after brewing, I tried what might be called "wet hopping." On the suggestion of sometime brew partner Mike Fetzer, I made a hop tea by steeping 1 ounce N. Brewer in 2 cups water after the water had just stopped boiling. This was kept covered for about 10 minutes. I 127 half. The bottles aged in my closet for two weeks before tasting. This turned out to be a very nice dry stout. It is dark and thick, with a brown head that lasts to the end and sticks to the side of the glass. The "no tea" beer is not terribly aromatic, and has a noticable bitter aftertase. The "hop tea" beer is more aromatic, and has a smoother finish, with what I think is a better blend of flavors. My fiancee likes the "hop tea" beer better as well, but a friend who only likes dark beers likes the "no tea" beer better. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.053 Final Gravity: 1.020 Primary Ferment: 1 week Secondary Ferment: 1 week 128

Kahlua Stout

Back to menu Source: Micah Millspaw, Posted by Bob Jones (BJONES@NOVA.llnl.gov) Digest: Issue #820, 2/10/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash at 160 degrees F. Add kahlua extract to primary before pitching yeast. 129

Oatmeal Stout

Back to menu Source: Russ Gelinas (R_GELINAS@UNHH.UNH.EDU) Digest: Issue #647, 5/29/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash pale malt and steel cut oats in 5 quarts of water. Sparge with 2 1/4 English 2-row pale malt, 1 lb. of steel cut oats, mashed in 5 qts. Added dark extract and dark DME to the wort and boiled with 2 oz. of Centennial leaf hops (AU=11.1, total=22.2 WHOOPS!) Good thing I like hops. Finished with 1 oz. of Cascade leaf hops. (AU=5) Pitched Wyeast Irish Ale yeast starter (#1084?), took 24 hrs. for active ferment. Comments: My notes on it were that it was clean, smooth, and hoppy. The hops over- whelmed any oat flavor, but the oats may have added to the smoothness. Reduce the hopping level by 1/2. Also, not enough roasted barley "bite". Increase RB from 1/3 oz. to 1/2 oz. at least, maybe 2/3 oz. would be best. There was also 1/2 oz. of crystal used. Specifics: Primary Ferment: 5 days Secondary Ferment: 2 weeks 130

Stout ala Guinness

Back to menu Source: Tony Babinec (tony@spss.com) Digest: Issue #734, 9/28/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Standard mashing procedure used. Comments: The beer turned out very well, and I got lots of good comments. It's a matter of taste, but if you prefer it a bit drier, you might reduce the crystal malt or drop it entirely, or for this gravity of stout, perhaps up the roasted barley to 1.25 pounds. 131

Clean Out The Closet Porter

Back to menu Source: Kevin L. McBride (gounceer!klm@uunet.UU.NET) Digest: Issue #674, 6/8/91 Ingredients That I Found Laying Around:
Procedure: Standard procedure---put crystal malt in cold water, heat to just shy of boil and sparge into brewpot. Add malt extracts and water, bring to boil. Add Brewer's Gold hops, boil a little over 1 hour. Stop boil, add Cascade hops and chill on the way into fermenter. I tossed the dry yeast directly into the fermenter atop the cooled wort. Comments: The yeast started flocculating within an hour and by the next morning the air lock was burping continuously. Today, 4 days later, it is completely fermented out and I'm going to transfer it into secondary probably before I go to bed. Specifics: Primary Ferment: 4 days 132

Gak & Gerry's #23: Anteater Porter

Back to menu Source: Richard Stueven (Richard.Stueven@Corp.Sun.COM) Gerry Lundquist Digest: Issue #746, 10/23/91 Ingredients:
Procedure: Add grains to 3.5 gallons cold water. Heat to 150 degrees and maintain for 90 minutes, stirring constantly. Used 4.5 gallons 170 degree sparge water. Collected 6 gallons wort. Boiled 60 minutes. Add Cluster at beginning of boil. Add 11.4 grams Cascade at 50 minutes. Turn off heat after 1 hour boil, and let last of Cascade hops steep. Cooled to about 75 derees and pitched. Comments: Deep red color. Looks almost black in the fermenter. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.048 Final Gravity: 1.014 133

Rat's Darkness

Back to menu Source: Jack Green (lunatix!gparsons@s.ms.uky.edu) 2/24/92 Ingredients:
Procedure: Cracked the grains and put them in 1.5 gallons of water, bring to boil and remover grains after 5 mins, add boiling hops and extract. Cook for 1 hour, add finishing hops for last 10 minutes. add to water in fer- menter, bring level up to 5 gallons. ferments out in about 8 days, tasted good right out of the fermenter, ready to drink in about 8-10 days. Bottled with 1 cup Amber Dry Extract. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.040 Final Gravity: 1.008 134

Brewhaus Porter

Back to menu Source: Ron Downer, Brewhaus Ingredients:
Procedure: Mash grains in 11 quarts of mash water at 152 degrees for two hours, or until conversion is complete. Sparge with 170 degree water to collect 6 gallons. Bring wort to a boil and let boil for 15 minutes before adding the 1-1/3 ounces Northern Brewer hops. Boil for one hour. Add Irish moss. Boil 30 minutes. (1 hour, 45 minutes total boiling time). Cut heat, add aromatic hops and let rest for 15 minutes. Force cool wort to yeast pitching temperature. Transfer cooled wort to primary fermenter and pitch yeast starter. Fine with geletin when fermentation is complete. Bottle with 3/4 cup corn sugar boiled in one cup water. Specifics: Original Gravity: 1.050 135